#ThinkAboutIt - Do You Have "Work" to Do on a Weekend?

One late afternoon during an impromptu rendezvous with a couple of friends at a coffee shop, the conversation briefly brought up the topic of the weekend. "What are your plans for the upcoming weekend?" one guy asked another and me.

The other guy answered. "I'm hoping to travel somewhere."

"Sounds great," the first guy said before turning to me. "What about you?"

Before I got the chance to reply, the second guy spoke for me without my consent. "He got work to do."

The look on the first guy's face gave away more than what he said next. "Work? Weekend?"

I responded with a smile on my face and silence. 

A similar incident happened a few weeks earlier. The set-up was somehow similar. An impromptu dinner. There were four of us instead of three. The topic of the weekend was brought up some time during the meal and another person answered on my behalf. "He got work to do."

Another guy, who I hanged out with for the first time that night, huffed sideways. A look of disapproval stretched across his face. "Work on a weekend?"

I responded with a smile on my face and silence.

To feel offended during those two incidents was easy but I took the challenging route and reminded myself what they said wasn't personal. It had nothing to do with me. It reflected their outlook on the words 'work' and 'weekend'. Let's define them:

 

Work - mental or physical activity as a means of earning income; employment.

Weekend - the period from Friday evening through Sunday evening, especially regarded as a time for leisure.

 

It's fairly easy to grasp why some people would scoff at the mention of the words 'work' and 'weekend' together. For most of society, employment and leisure do not and should not mesh together. They can never be peanut butter and jelly. Instead, they're water and oil. Society has been deeply conditioned that work is not fun and the weekend must be reserved for leisure and fun. But society got it wrong.

Work can be fun.

 

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
— Confucius

The sole reason why most people hate the idea of work and work itself is because they don't love their work. Most people choose their careers because they deem it lucrative and that it will lead them quickly to wealth and success. But deep inside, it's not really what they want. Because they choose a path not aligned with their core values, they spend the rest of their lives as the walking dead, zombies just getting by day by day in their jobs, in their lives. No enthusiasm. No joy. No adventure. No fire.

I used to be one of them.

I woke up every day and went to work not really looking forward to it. As soon as I sat on the chair in front of my desk, I wanted the daily work to end so I could bolt out of the office, return home, play computer games, watch TV shows, and endlessly scroll my Facebook feed snooping on other people's lives and hoping others would snoop on my uneventful one. I always looked forward to leaving the office instead of going there. I used to looked forward to doing cool things every weekend. I kept evading the question I strongly wanted to ask myself but feared to. "Is this all there is to life?"

All that changed when I found the work of my life. The work of my life:

The one that pops first thing in my mind as soon as I wake up in the morning. "What must I do today to push my work forward?"

The one that energizes me the way coffee, food, and other drugs can never. "I got work to do and I'm excited."

The one that keeps me up and hopeful after every disappointment, failure, and misgiving. "If I stop now, I give away the meaning of my life."

The one that keeps me company amidst the loneliness, confusion, and misunderstanding. "I must see this through no matter what."

The one that plays last in my head right before I sleep. "What did I accomplish today for my work? Was it enough? Should I do more tomorrow?"

The one that makes me happy and fulfilled inside the way clothes, gadgets, and other trinkets can never. "I love it."

 

When you find your "work", it will not matter whether you do it on a Monday, Wednesday, Saturday, or Sunday. You will do it anytime because you love it. You will do it anywhere because you love it. You will do it because it fulfils you, it is your purpose, and it makes you happy - it's fun. 

I wrote the first draft of this article at a coffee shop (thank the Rowling-wannabe in me). It was the weekend. It was fun. Do you have work to do on a weekend too?